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Empty Tomb Rolls

Just for Fun! “Empty Tomb” Rolls

Looking for a fun and easy recipe to bake with the kids this Easter weekend?  Check out these “Empty Tomb” rolls.  You can’t go wrong with marshmallows, butter and cinnamon and sugar!  Just be sure to seal them tight so the gooey goodness doesn’t escape from the “tomb”.

https://www.the-girl-who-ate-everything.com/empty-tomb-rolls/

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Passover Cookies

Passover Cookies to enjoy all year!

Kosher for Passover, and gluten-free, these cookies work all year round!  Start early, or the day before, because this dough needs some time to chill. Check out the recipe for these delicious almond cookies from Epicurious below!

https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/almond-cookies-with-cardamom-orange-zest-and-pistachios

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Seder Eggs – Beitza

Get Roasted.  But it’s not what you think.

seder plate

During Pesach/Passover many Jewish people use hard-boiled eggs as part of the celebration.  However, Jews from the Sephardi/Mizrachi tradition use oven-roasted or braised eggs.  Beitza.  This can be tricky because eggs will explode if they are just put into the oven and roasted at high temperatures. So, here are some traditional methods for roasting an egg:

  • The traditional method from Jews who lived in Transylvania/Turkey and the Balkan countries (Bulgaria/Romania, Croatia/Serbia, Macedonia, etc.) is to rub the egg with oil, and partially submerge it into the braising liquid with the meat and vegetables being prepared in the oven for the Seder meal.
  • The Mizrachi tradition (from Iran/Persia, Iraq/Syria, etc.) is to rub oil on the egg and wrap strips of meat around it, or stuff the eggs into the cavity of a hen or create a pocket in the meat to put the egg so the meat is holding/covering it. This acts as an insulation and causes the eggs to heat slower and cook evenly, so there’s less chance that the egg will explode
  • Another interesting method is the Yemenite-Jewish tradition of soft-boiling the egg for two to four minutes in coffee, and then placing the egg into or under the roasting meat in the oven. Whichever way you try, roasting an egg makes it really flavorful because the juices, broth, the flavors from spices, and the meat permeate the egg while roasting to create a wonderful treat!

At the conclusion of the Seder, it is customary to wish everyone Shalom/Peace and a return to the homeland by saying “Next year in Jerusalem!

-Written by Rabbi Yehonatan Levy (Chef Jonathon Levy)

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Super Bowl LII Game Day Food

Our Favorite Super Bowl Recipes

It’s time to start thinking about your super bowl eating strategy because let’s admit it – you’re only here for the food. Sure, two great teams are going up against each other for a shot at that ring. But we’re here for the tasty, tasty food. And maybe the commercials too.

Whether your keeping things simple, heading to a potluck party or hosting a huge gathering, we’ve got some great recipe ideas that are sure to keep your guests satisfied from kick off to MVP pick. Check out our personal chefs’ favorite game day food below!

BLT Bites – Chef Brandon O’Dell

1 pkg     cherry tomatoes
¼ lb       crisp cooked bacon (substitute turkey bacon for a low-fat recipe)
1 cup     parsley leaves
½ cup    mayonnaise (you can substitute fat free mayo to make this low fat)

This is a stuffed cherry tomato recipe that resembles the popular flavor of BLT sandwiches. Start by using a sharp paring knife to cut a flat base on the bottom of each cherry tomato. Don’t cut off too much, just enough to give the tomato a small, flat base. With the same knife inverted downward, cut out the stem area of the tomato creating a circular opening ¾ the diameter of the tomato and hollowing out at least half of the inside of the tomato without cutting to the bottom of the tomato. Place tomatoes to the side to drain while you prepare the filling.

Break the bacon into pieces by hand and place in a food processor. Add the parsley and the mayonnaise. Blend until all pieces are small enough to be piped through a 3/8 inch opening. If the ingredients seem too dry to pipe, add mayonnaise until the filling is the correct mixture. Depending on the thickness of your bacon, you could also have to use less mayo than the recipe calls for. If you’re unsure, add half the mayo and blend, then continue to add more until the mixture reaches a consistency that can be piped, but not so loose that it is runny.

Put the filling mixture into a pastry bag, or create a makeshift pastry bag by putting the mixture into a one gallon plastic storage bag, cutting just enough of the tip to make an opening a little less than half an inch. Pipe the mixture into the openings of the tomatoes and chill until it’s time to serve. These tomatoes add beauty to any food table, and are incredibly flavorful while still being very simple.

 

“Banh Mi” Sliders – Chef Mark Maybon
Banh Mi Sliders

1 lb ground chicken thigh
1 lb ground pork
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tbsp ginger, minced
1 shallot, minced
1 tbsp lemongrass, finely minced (only tender core)
2 eggs
2 tbsp oyster sauce
1 cup breadcrumbs

 

  1. Saute first 4 ingredients until translucent and fragrant. Cool slightly.
  2. Gently mix sauteed veg and the rest of ingredients in a large bowl until just combined and homogenous.
  3. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper. Spray with cooking spray or oil. With wet hands, roll meatball mix into 1.5 oz balls and slightly flatten before putting on prepared sheet pan.
  4. Roast at 375 F until cooked through, approximately 12-15 minutes.

Cilantro Lime Carrot Slaw
3 cups shredded carrots
1 bunch minced cilantro
1 lime, juiced

  1. Toss to combine.

Oyster Sauce Aioli
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup oyster sauce

  1. Stir together in a bowl.

To assemble, split slider buns and spread aioli on top and bottom. Placed carrot slaw on bottom and top with meatball. (Optionally add super thin sliced fresh jalapeno rounds.) Place top buns on and skewer sliders to hold together for presentation. (If using jalapenos on all or half of sliders, place a slice on top to warn guests of spiciness)

 

Shredded Chicken Taquitos – Nate Lane

1.25lbs chicken breast, cooked & shreddedShredded Chicken Taquitos
4 ounces frozen chopped spinach
6 ounces cream cheese, softened
one packet Williams taco seasoning
20 corn tortillas
oil for frying

Method:

Mix chicken, spinach, cream cheese, and taco seasoning. Heat tortillas in microwave till warm and flexible. Divide chicken mixture among tortillas and wrapped tightly. Use toothpick to hold in place and pan fry over medium heat till each side is slightly browned. Best served with guacamole!

Teriyaki Wings – Chef Karie Baima

2 lb wing drummettesteriyaki wings
1 tbsp minced garlic
1tbsp minced ginger
1/3 c low sodium soy sauce
1/3 c brown sugar
2 tbsp aji mirin
3 green onions sliced
1 tbsp sesame seeds
Salt to taste

Method:

Heat oven to 350 °. Toss the wings with salt to taste and spread on a sheet pan. If the wings are touching, then use 2 sheet pans. This way they get crispy. Bake for 25 minutes, flip them and rotate the sheet pans and bake another 15 minutes, or until very tender. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, simmer the soy sauce, garlic, ginger, brown sugar and mirin for 10 minutes. Toss the sauce with the wings after their 2nd part of cooking. Return to the oven for another 10 minutes. Garnish with green onions and sesame seeds.

 

Buffalo chicken dip – Chef Travis Shaw

3-5 stalks celeryBuffalo Chicken Dip
1 onion
2-3 chicken breasts
2 cups buffalo sauce
1 package cream cheese
Blue cheese to taste
Salt and pepper to taste

Method:

1) Sear chicken, remove, bake in 350F oven till cooked through
2) dice vegetables and add sauce or pan to deglaze
3) add buffalo sauce, cook till simmering, remove from heat, S&P to taste
4) beak apart cream cheese into pan and mix with till melted
5) pull chicken and add to pan
6) sprinkle blue cheese to taste
7) bake to melt cheese
8) enjoy with chips or veggies, great as lettuce wraps

 

Vegan cheese dip – Chef Emilie Newcomb

1 large carrot, peeled Vegan Cheese Dip
2 medium sized Yukon gold, peeled
3 cups veggie broth
1/2 onion
4 cloves garlic
3/4 cup cashews
1/4 cup nutritional yeast
Paprika, cayenne, curry powder, black pepper, salt (to taste)

Method:

– Cut potato and carrot into 1-inch cubes
– In a pot, cook potato and carrot with veggie stock until soft
– While that’s cooking, chop the onion and garlic and sauté on medium/low until translucent
– Pour everything into blender
– Add cashews, nutritional yeast, and spices
– If it is too thick, add more stock. If it is too thin, add more cashews and nutritional yeast
-blend on high for one minute
– Add all spices
– Taste, then adjust to your liking
– Enjoy!

 

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The Great Pumpkin Adventure- Beyond the PSL

IT’S PUMPKIN SEASON!!

And beyond the ever loved PSL, there are about a million things you can do with the delicious gourd.  A friend recently told me that she isn’t a huge fan, because she has only had it prepared super sweet.  She didn’t even think of the gazillion other spices she could put with it.  But trust me, if you like butternut squash, you will love pumpkin.

There are a couple of things to keep in mind before you begin your Great Pumpkin adventures (see what I did there!)  First, don’t use the jack-o-lantern that has been sitting on your front porch for the last several weeks.  One, it’s rotten.  Two, it’s not the right kind of pumpkin.  Three, it’ rotten.  “But we just carved it last night?”  Yeah, and about a bazillion flies and other bugs have already made it a fun little breeding and feeding ground overnight, if the squirrels didn’t get to it first.  Plus, you’ve had it for several weeks, or days, sitting in the hot, direct, daytime sunlight.  Not an ideal storage place for vegetables.  Trust me, it won’t be good.  And it’s not even the right kind to begin with.  What you want is called a pie pumpkin.  They are small-ish, cute and have a much sweeter and more tender flesh than the big guy you bought at the pumpkin patch.  You should be able to find them at your local patch or grocery store pretty easily.

“So how do I cook it?”  They are quite easy to prepare, actually.  You can either cut it in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and roast it in a 400-degree oven for about 30-45 minutes.  Or you can prick the whole thing with a fork or paring knife and roast the whole thing, same way as above, for about an hour.  Save the seeds though!  After a quick scrub, some olive oil and sea salt, and quick toast in the oven, they make the best salad toppings and granola add-ins!  You can save the seeds from your carved pumpkin too, if you haven’t already thrown them away.

“Now what do I do with it?”  Well…whatever you want, really.  Think of it just like any other squash.  It makes a velvety creamy soup, is perfect to hide in chili and sauces for picky-kids, pancakes, French Toast, muffins, breads, cakes, pastas and even cocktails.  The sky is the limit.  Your pumpkin may yield more than you need for whatever recipe you decide, but it freeze well.

If cooking a whole pumpkin isn’t your things, no worries!  The canned stuff is delicious too.  And most brands are simply ‘just pumpkin’, so you don’t have to worry about getting a bunch of extra stuff you don’t want.  Check out this link from Food Network Magazine for 50 ideas to get you started.  And if you aren’t a big fan of cinnamon and nutmeg, you are in luck.  Because pumpkin pairs well with lots of other spices and herbs.

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Save Your Summer: A Guide To Sun-Drying

sun-dried tomatoesIt’s the end of the growing season for most of our summer herbs and vegetables, or at least close to it.  Maybe you were really lucky and able to eat everything you grew, or gave it away.  Or maybe you are like the other 99% of the population and you ended up with a bumper crop of all of your favorite things.  It happens to the best of us.  Our eyes are bigger than our proverbial garden stomachs and we buy too many plants.

But what happens to the extras?  After your neighbors and co-workers have had their fill, you’ve canned, pickled and preserved until your shelves are full but you can’t bear to see the precious hard-work go to waste.  There is still one easy, and very tasty way, to save the last bits of summer.  Sun-Drying!

I was thinking about this during the #SolarEclipse2017, when everything was all about the sun.  And it’s an excellent way to preserve fruits, veggies and herbs!  It also lends them to your favorite fall and winter recipes different than canning would.  So, what is good to sun-dry?  Almost everything!  But before you toss your produce on the back porch and call it good, there are a few things to keep in mind.

The whole point of sun-dying is to remove as much moisture as possible from the produce in order to preserve the flavor and nutrients for later use.  Bacteria and mold need moisture to survive and grow.  Remove it, and no more bacteria.  Some produce is going to take longer than others to achieve optimal dryness, so you have to pay attention.  Hot, all-day sun is best, and pay attention to humidity levels.  We want water leaving the produce, not going back in!

Equipment.  Tossing some tomatoes on a sheet pan and calling it good is only going to get you a big, moldy blob of tomato goo.  You need to make sure there is plenty of room for air to circulate around the entire vegetable or fruit to make sure it dries evenly.  Use a sheet pan, lined with parchment and a drying rack.  This will elevate the product to allow even air flow.  Also, unless you plan on standing over the product for a day or two, you might need to protect it from critters; bugs, squirrels, birds and the like.  You can easily make a cage of chicken wire or other wire grafting material and cover it with cheesecloth or some other kind of netting-like fabric.  Remember, sunlight is key, so make sure you can see thru it well.   You can also purchase something like this from Amazon.

Size.  In this case, it matters.  Just like when you cook food, it needs to be of uniform consistency and shape.  Also, the smaller the food, the faster it will dry.  For tomatoes, slice them in half or quarters and remove the seeds.  For zucchini, squash, peppers, etc, slice them into ¼ inch rounds or strips.  Slicing is a good idea for fruits too.  You also want to cut your produce to allow air inside the flesh.  The skin is there to keep air out.  So you need to break the skin to allow air in.  For berries that you would want to keep whole (because who wants to slice a million pounds of blueberries?!), blanch in boiling water for a few seconds to crack the skin.  This could work for cherry tomatoes too.

Oxidation.  You know when you’ve cut into an avocado and it starts to turn brown?  That’s called oxidation.  It’s when air mixes with the molecules of the flesh of the fruit and makes it turn an icky brown color.  It’s still delicious, just not delicious to look at.  It mostly happens to fruit and there are a couple of ways to prevent it.  Soaking the fruit in a mixture of lemon juice and water will usually do the trick.  Ascorbic acid and citric acid work well too.  You can buy them in powdered form to sprinkle on the flesh of the fruit.

Leafy greens and herbs.  Air drying herbs is my favorite way to preserve them.  I can only eat so much pesto by January before I wish I had some plain fresh basil.  Freezing in olive oil, or making an herb oil is good too, but limiting to how I can use it in a finished product.  Pick the leaves from the stems of the herbs and lay out on a parchment lined sheet pan.  You don’t need a drying rack in this case because of the flat, thin nature of the leaves.  Spinach, kale and chard are all great to air dry too.  You want the leaves to be as separated as much as possible.  And thicker, curly leaves like kale will take longer than the tiny leaves from herbs like thyme and oregano.  Dry whole, chop later.

If you don’t have a lot of direct sunlight, or maybe you don’t have the space to sun-dry, the oven works well for drying too.  Set it to the lowest temperature setting possible, and apply the same rules as above.  The oven will most likely take less time, as it is a more direct heat applied in a smaller space, but the results should be the same.

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Build Your Cookbook Library Like A Pro

We all have it.  That one book sitting on the counter.  Bent spine, dogeared, bookmarked and stained.  It’s the go-to.  The favorite.  Maybe it’s a collection of family heirlooms, a digital wallet stored on your iPad, a wedding present from your dear Aunt Sally, or a corner bookstore find.  A good cookbook can help plan that Thanksgiving feast for 20 or Tuesday night’s meatloaf supper.

For our chefs, they are a source of inspiration, and a education.  Just like a any other professional, chefs need to keep up with current trends, and brush up on techniques learned early in our careers.  It’s more than a hobby- it’s a lifestyle.

We get asked all the time, “What book should I have in my kitchen?”.  So we wanted to put together for you a  list of our chefs’ favorites.  Some are more reference books than recipe books.  But we still think they are great, even for the most novice of cooks.  Check out our list below and comment on your favorites.  Follow us on Instagram for the latest updates from Friend That Cooks!

The Complete America’s Test Kitchen TV Show Cookbook is great for everyday recipes.
Charcuterie, for meats: smoking, curing, salting and more. 
The Chefs Reference Guide is a great resource for the advanced home cook.
Instead of Google, grab a copy of Food Lover’s Companion. A great resource for anything food.
Composing the perfect dish is a breeze with Culinary Artistry. A great resource book for all home cooks.
Genuinely delicious and fun “fancy southern” cuisine from a Top Chef contestant, Fire In My Belly.
Learn everything pasta in Flour+Water: Pasta.
If bread is your thing, or maybe you want to learn, Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast is great to have in your kitchen.
The French Laundry Cookbook delivers beautiful pictures and exquisite technique.
TV show personality delivers classic and fun foods in Guy Fieri Family Food.
Sean Brock, a Charleston legend in his own right, shows you how to make classic, southern dishes that are beautiful and sustainable.
Momofuku is a must for anyone looking to step-up their Asian culinary game.
On Cooking, a texbook and staple for any cook. A must-own for all.
Staff Meals is fun and original cookbook with wholesome recipes, unique ingredients and a laid-back approach.
Bon Appetit’s The Grilling Book should be your can’t-live-without, summer grilling guide.
Get serious pastry skills with The Pastry Chef’s Companion recipe and resource guide.
Not just for vegans, Thug Kitchen’s NSFW first official cookbook has taken the food world by storm. Get serious about eating more vegetables and get a copy of this book…yesterday!

 

Ethnic Food Lover’s Companion makes cooking your favorite ethnic dish a breeze.
The Cook’s book is a great resource for tips and tricks from chef’s all over the world.

 

If you like breakfast foods, you need The Breakfast Book. Think farm-house simple.
When you aren’t sure what to pair with this, or how to spice that, The Flavor Bible is every cook’s go-to.
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Too Many Tomatoes I From Mama Natural

28 Things to Do With Too Many Tomatoes

tomatoesLate in the summer, many gardeners end up with too many tomatoes! Come late-August, you may end up with a dozen or two heirlooms ripening on your kitchen counter, with dozens more cherry, San Marzano, Brandywine, Yellow Pear, Roma, Campari, Jubilee, Beefsteak and countless other tomato varieties ripening on the vines outside.

This is not necessarily a bad thing but it can be intimidating trying to think of ways to utilize them. Before we start, I have an idea of my own. First, cook down those fresh tomatoes and add some onion, celery and celery salt until the vegetables are tender. Now run that through a food mill and add some salt and lemon juice to taste. Don’t forget the last and most crucial ingredient…Vodka!

Now that you have a delicious bloody mary in your hands, you can click the link below to find out 28 ways to use all those extra tomatoes from your garden while they are at peak freshness!

28 Things to Do With Too Many Tomatoes

Leave a comment below with your favorite ideas and recipes using your garden vegetables and herbs.

Click here to learn more about Friend That Cooks Personal Chef Service.

 

 

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From Food & Wine | Maple Roasted Ribs

Maple Roasted Ribs

Hey, here’s a great maple roasted ribs recipe we found at Food and Wine magazines website. Not all ribs have to be smoked, here’s another great way to make spare ribs. Our talented personal chefs know many fun and interesting recipes like this that we use every day for our weekly meal prep clients…

http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/maple-roasted-pork-spareribs

Maple roasted ribs from Food and Wine magazine
Maple roasted pork spare ribs from Food and Wine magazine

Learn more about weekly meal prep from Friend That Cooks Personal Chefs on our website.

 

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Goat Cheese Quiche Recipe

Goat Cheese & Caramelized Onion Quiche

Egg facesQuiche is our favorite!  It is versatile, can be eaten at any time of day, and is super easy to make.  This recipe comes from our very own Christina Hoffeld in Chicago.

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1 store bought or scratch made crust
  • 6 eggs
  • 6-8 ounces goat cheese, softened
  • 1/4 cup cream
  • 1 onion, caramelized
  • 2T chopped fresh chives

Procedure

  1. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  
  2. Place the pie shell into a deep-dish pie pan and crimp the edges with a fork.  Prick the bottom of the crust all over with the tines of a fork.  Cover the interior of the shell with parchment paper and add baking beads or dried beans to weigh the crust down. Bake for 15 minutes.  
  3. Meanwhile, combine eggs, cheese, cream caramelized onion and chives in a large mixing bowl and whisk to combine.  
  4. Remove the parchment paper and baking beads from the par baked crust.  Pour the quiche filling into the crust and bake for 40 minutes more, or until set in the center.
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Shakshuka Recipe

Shakshuka Recipe

EggsShakshuka is probably one of the best egg dishes known to man.  A Middle Eastern dish of tomatoes, peppers, spices and eggs, this dish can be enjoyed at any time of day and rivals even the best Mexican chilaquiles.  Feel free to experiment with your own spice blends to make it your own!  But whatever you do, be sure to have lots of bread ready to soak up all that tomato goodness!

Yield: 4

Ingredients

  • Extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 red bell peppers
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 diced spicy pepper such as jalapeno, serrano or thai chili, depending on preference (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • ½ teaspoon cumin
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • Pinch of cayenne (optional)
  • Pinch of coriander
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • (1) 28 ounce can diced tomatoes
  • 4 eggs, whole
  • Chopped parsley, about 1 handful
  • Crusty bread for serving

Procedure

  1. Prepare a grill or broiler on high heat.  Rub the bell peppers with olive oil and grill or broil until well charred on the outside skin.  Place in a heatproof bowl covered with plastic wrap and let sit for 20 minutes.  Remove the charred skin, remove the seeds and stems and discard, and dice the peppers.  Set aside.  
  2. In a 12-inch frying pan with a lid, heat a small amount of olive oil on high heat.  Add the diced onion and garlic and sauté until translucent, but not browned.  
  3. Add the chili, if using, and continue to sauté until soft.  Add the spices and stir until fragrant.  
  4. Add the tomatoes, reduce the heat to medium, and allow the mixture to simmer for about 5 minutes, or until a full, spicy aroma develops and the sauce thickens.  
  5. Carefully crack the eggs into the mixture and reduce the heat to low.  Cover the pan with the lid, and allow the eggs to steam in the mixture until cooked to your desired doneness- about 3 minutes for soft, 5 minutes for medium, or 7 minutes for hard cooked eggs.  
  6. Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Serve immediately with lots of crusty bread for dipping.
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Autumn Flavor Ideas | The Apple

The Apple

Autumn Flavor Ideas
Autumn Flavor Ideas
The first iconic flavor of Autumn, until pumpkin spice came to town. But we want to bring back the apple. Because it’s not just for pies, although it does make one heck of a dessert. With thousands of varieties to choose from, you are sure to find the right one. And if you don’t want to find a local orchard and pick your own, you can usually find about 10 different options at your local grocery market. They look great, taste great, and pack quite a nutritional punch with vitamins A and C and antioxidants. Weather you eat ‘em or drink ‘em, you know the old saying. “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.”

Looking for a new way to mix apples into the menu? Try some of these ideas!

  • Grated or julienned apples in a classic slaw
  • Diced with black beans, avocado, jalapenos and lime juice salad
  • Cored and sliced, roasted with pork tenderloin, onions and rosemary
  • Swap out the beer or red wine in your Sunday beef roast for Apple Cider or Applejack
  • Add diced apples the last 5-10 minutes when roasting Brussel’s Sprouts
  • Add grated apples to braised red cabbage or homemade sauerkraut
  • Instead of raisins, add small diced apple on peanut butter and celery boats for a tasty and fun snack
  • Thinly slice apples and fennel bulb for a vibrant and light salad
  • Add apples to your butternut squash soup recipe
  • Dice an apple and add it to your oatmeal for a hearty and warming breakfast
  • Add small diced apples, or applesauce, to pancakes and crepes
  • Add sliced apples to the bottom of a pumpkin pie. Best of both worlds!
  • Peruse the blog and find more recipes and fun ways to use great ingredients! Check out our website to learn more about weekly meal prep.